Chevrolet Corvette Named After a War Ship in this year

Chevrolet Corvette named after a War Ship you say? Corvette is a French word given to (nautical, historical) a flush-decked warship of the 17th-18th centuries having a single tier of guns; it ranked next below a frigate; In the modern navy, a lightly armed and armored blue water warship, smaller than a frigate, capable of trans-oceanic duty.

Most modern Navies of the world include War Ships in the Corvette class in their fleets. You may remember seeing in the news ROKS Cheonan (PCC-772) was a South Korean Pohang-class Corvette of the Republic of Korea Navy (ROKN), commissioned in 1989. On 26 March 2010, it broke in two and sank near the sea border with North Korea. North Korean torpedo from an attack submarine was believed to be the cause of its sinking.

In 1953 the first of the classic Corvettes hand built in Flint, Michigan named after a famous class War Ship the two door sports car was meant to be a gentlemen’s sports car. Although a Classic beauty it was under powered with its 6 cylinder engine it almost fell by the wayside.

The birth of the Chevrolet Corvette may not have happened had it not been for the War. You see steel was still in short supply back in 1953 which sent the car designer looking for a new idea. A promising new product hit the market that was durable and could be shaped into ca car body without much trouble. And a revolution started with the invention of fiberglass. The first of the Corvettes were hand built with fiberglass bodies and standard Chevrolet parts.

The 53 was powered with Blue Flame 6 cylinder truck motor that proved to be underpowered for the Corvette. It did get some upgrades to spice it up a little a three duce intake set up and by 54 some of the dealers were installing Paxton supercharges.

Many say had it not been for the development and release of the small block V8 a 265 cubic inch engine of 1955 the Corvette would not be with us today. From 1955 on the new V8 put the Chevrolet Corvette on the map being a true performer.

Owning one of these classics today has become a matter of immense pride. From the first to the models be built today they are stylish and classic and many appreciate the beauty of a high powered Chevy Corvette. Although very costly there is the attraction of their fuel economy. For the adventurous true connoisseur they are especially popular.

The market for restored Chevrolet Corvettes is powerful with the invention of internet auction sites, buying and selling these classic beauty’s has become safe, easy and convenient. You can find restored original condition better than when they were new. Another class out there is restored using the latest technologies like disk brakes and modern power options and air conditioning. Many get attached and will not ever let them go.

How To Build A Rat Rod – From Beginner To Expert in this year

So you have finally decided to build your Rat Rod car and you feel that you know what to do, but if you are smart, you will always be open to suggestions. Knowing the basics will help you get a good start.

For those of you who are new at this, keep it simple. No one wants their project to remain a project, and not a driver. Beginners should save up a bit more money and try to get something that runs and drives. Bodywork and modifications can be done at your leisure, as long as your Rat Rod doesn’t have huge holes in it. Spend more time customizing your Rat Rod than fixing it. Messing with a car when you don’t have the experience is very tough, and although you might have some friends to help, chance are they will not always be there to help you. Don’t get a Rat Rod that has electrical issues or motor problems. It’s most likely that someone has “patched” it up to get it sale-able and now you are stuck with someone else’s headache. Don’t fall in love with a piece of junk. Let your brain choose your new Rat Rod, not your emotions.

For those of you that have been doing this for a while, here are a few tips for you. Keeping the cool factor with Flathead Fords and 392 Chrysler Hemi’s are great. Nothing show a better Rat Rod then with period correct parts arranged and selected in a tasteful manner. Try not to find anything old and rusty and just weld it to the car or bolt it to the motor. Having a unique powered car is cool though. There is nothing wrong with the old reliable Chevy small block, and with all the aftermarket parts out there, you can make it look correct for that era. Big blown motors are not necessary as Rat Rods are not made to be driven at the strip, but if you have the means, you can do it, but like we always say, keep it period correct. Find a blower from the early 40’s or 50’s. Big fancy drum brakes from old Buick’s are popular. Use your imagination and keep it cool.

Whether you are new at this, or are just looking for other ideas for a new build, make a plan, and follow through with it and build the Rat Rod of your dreams.

Vintage Volkswagen Racing: The Beginning of Deano Dyno-Soar in this year

Dean Lowry joined Joe Vittone and his VW dealership Economotors in Riverside, California in 1955. After realizing how easy it was to repair and service Volkswagen Dean learned all he could and increased his skill level. He decided to make a career of Volkswagens and increasing their performance on the drag strip.

While working for Century Motors in Alhambra, California, Dean helped to build a racing VW beetle that he raced regularly for five months. He then built a dragster with a Porsche engine and began campaigning it in several local drag racing events.

Joe asked Dean to return to Economotors in 1963 and began once again to work with EMPI performance parts. He developed exhaust systems, carburetor kits and valve kits. At this time, Dean built the famous Inch Pincher race VW, one of the most famous race cars.

In 1968 Dean left Economotors again and partnered up with his brother Ken to start their own VW repair and service shop in Santa Ana, California. The brothers wanted to focus solely on building and repairing VW engines full time. This new business was called Deano Dyno-Soars, after Dean’s nickname of Deano or Dino.

The Lowry brothers stuck with the dinosaur theme throughout their business, and took up the color purple. They created the Purple Dyno-Soar engine, which was painted purple. The racecars and even their service shop was also colored purple. It became their trademark color.

The Lowrys often went drag racing with Dean’s daily driver, a 1954 VW sedan with a 2180cc engine. The car had been lightened to reduce the weight. Custom lightweight spun-aluminum wheels were designed specifically for drag racing VWs and made their debut on the Dyno-Soar racing vehicle. It’s best time was 11.62 sec and was the car to beat in the NHRA H/Gas class.

One major advancement Deano Dyno-Soar made in the VW racing world was developing an aftermarket crankcase that allowed VW engines up to the size of 3 liters to be built and housed in the rear engine compartment. It was known as the Ultra Case. Deano Dyno-Soar also designed and developed the first set of aftermarket cylinder heads for VW drag racing. They allowed larger valves to be used than a regular VW head.

After winning numerous races and trophies, they decided to retire the drag racing VW in 1972. The business also called its doors in 1972 and the brothers went their separate ways.

Why Rust is Like Cancer to Your Car in this year

Rust can absolutely ruin the metal on a car. It is best to prevent the rust from ever taking hold on your car by washing it frequently. I recommend washing at least once a week, especially in areas that use salt on the road during the cold months. All that salt and dirt and grime that builds up tends to hold the moisture in and that leaves a perfect environment for rust to begin. It often will set up in a place that has been dented or the paint has chipped. Exam your car often for small spots of rust. It is much easier to repair the rusted area when it is just a small spot.

That’s really the key. You want to repair the area while it is only on the surface. Once the rust travels deeper into the metal it becomes a much bigger and more expensive repair job. My work restoring vintage muscle cars taught me early on that rust can be lurking underneath a shoddy patch job that has been painted over. You can do a check for this by simply going around the car and knocking on the metal.

That can tell you, based on the clear metal sound or the thud of putty work used to hide rust, if the car is solid or not. It is a test I do before purchasing any car, whether it is only a year old or is one of the vintage muscle cars that I will be restoring. You should also inspect underneath the car and check the wheel wells as well. Both are prime locations for rust to begin. Never buy a car that has been in an accident, even if it was just a small accident. They car likely received some sort of damage to the paint that will be a prime target for rust. Even if the person selling the car claims to have had the car repaired by an expert. Don’t purchase it. Even with an expert doing the repair, it is very likely that rust will take hold. Take the time to check out any car before you purchase. It could save you thousands of dollars in costly rust repairs, in the long run.

Protecting The Car With A Garage Or A Car Cover? in this year

When winter comes along, many people think that cars now belong indoors. They know that leaving a car outdoors unprotected is not an option. It is a recipe for disaster. Any car that is left parked outside, without any form of protection, is guaranteed to get wrecked in some way or another. The fact remains; a car that is uncovered has a shorter life expectancy.

So the question remain, what form of protection to provide? There is a choice of two forms of protection; a garage, or a car cover. Both have their own advantages and disadvantages. They must be weighed up by the individual, to see which is the better of the two for him.

Garages:

The advantage of garages is that when parked in a garage, the car is completely closed off from any form of weather condition, and therefore cannot, in any way, be harmed by them. Garages are also very convenient for the car owner, as he always know where his car is parked, and never has to search for a space. Another advantage of garages is that they can be used by anyone. More or less any car can drive into the garage and be protected.

However, the disadvantages of having a garage largely lie in the money and space involved. Garages are expensive to build as they are not merely three wall and a door. There is more to a garage, and the money mounts up. Aside from this, a lot of people simply do not have the space to build a garage. Even if they did, they would much prefer to use that space for extending the house, rather than building a room to keep a car over night.

In addition, when a car is stored in a garage it is not dust and dirt free. Whilst the garage may be able to protect it from the detriments of nature, and car thieves, the car is still exposed to dust and dirt, and hence will still need constant cleaning.

Car covers:

The main advantage of car covers is the how compact they are. Car covers, when not in use, can be folded up and tucked away,out of sight. They can even be stored in the trunk of the car. This enables the car owner to take it along with him wherever he goes, so that he and his car are always covered. This is something that garages can never have – portability.

Car cover are also inexpensive, and cost effective. Cover covers are a drop in the bucket compared to the expense of a garage, and they also provide excellent coverage and protection. In fact they will even protect the car from dust and dirt, unlike garages. They will be able to save the car owner hundreds of dollars over the years that would have otherwise been used for cleaning, polishing and repairs.

On the other hand, the good car covers only come custom-made. This means that they are designed to fit the one car, perfectly. The cover will fit the car like a glove, maximising the protection, but it means that no other car can use it. Thus, it cannot be shared amongst family and friends, and when a new car is bought, the cover needs to be changed too.

In addition, car covers are not as sturdy as garages. Yes they will be able to protect the car from just about everything, including knocks and scrapes. Covers absorb the impact without leaving a mark on the car itself. However this is on a small scale, and should there be a more fierce collision, the cover will be inept at shielding the car.

The History of the VW Beetle – One of the World’s Classic Cars in this year

The VW Beetle is one of the most well known cars in history. The beetle came out initially in 1938, and has been in production in one form or another for most of the years from 1938 to 2003. The VW Beetle is without doubt one of the most classic cars in history. And the history of the VW Beetle is an interesting one indeed.

The original idea for the VW Beetle, or what is also known as the VW Bug, came from Adolf Hitler. It is said that he had the idea of a “peoples car” in 1924 whilst he way in prison. He wanted a car that anyone could afford, and also to help with the unemployment problem that existed in post WW1 Germany. In 1933 the Nazi party came to power and Hitler raised the issue of building special roads for the peoples car, and in 1933 the government began a program of construction of “autobahns” for German drivers. “Volkswagon” (VW) is the German name for peoples car.

Hitler wanted the design project for the Beetle started and gave the job to Ferdinand Porshe, later to become very well known for the “Porsche” cars that bore his name. Hitler specified some criteria, including a top speed of 62 mph (100 kmh), at least 42 miles to the gallon fuel consumption, able to transport at least 2 adults and 3 children and to be able to sell for less than what was at the time the equivalent of 86 pounds (UK currency).

Thus began the history of the VW Beetle, arguably the most famous car in history.

The big question was the engine to be used and the placement of the engine, and in 1935 an Austrial engineer came up with a design for a flat four engine, Porshe having previously decided that the engine should be rear mounted. This engine was an air cooled engine, and was cheap to build, and this engine powered hundreds of thousands of beetles for the next 40 years.

And the name even came from Adolf Hitler. He specified a car that would “look like a beetle” so it was well streamlined, and hence the name “Beetle”. Then “Bug”. And the history of the VW Beetle records that that body shape changed little over many decades.

The basic style of the VW Beetle changed little over many decades, though of course there were many different models, but each model had the same basic beetle shape, and the engine changed little too. The manufacture of the Volkswagen Beetle stopped in 1980, at what point it had become the worlds most popular car.

The VW Beetle is not the worlds fastest car. It will, technically, do 0 – 50 mph in 13 seconds, a little slower than most cars today, but it had other features that made it popular. It was cheap to buy and run, simple to work on and reliable. It had only a small motor and, although originally required by Hitler to do 42 mpg, actually did a little over 30 mpg. That, however, is still very good compared to many modern cars.

That’s the basic history of the VW Beetle. It was and is one of the worlds classic cars. It spawned a whole generation of great small cars, like the VW golf, and sold hundreds of thousands. It has also been the basis of many other vehicles. For example many vehicles such as dune buggies are based on a simple VW Beetel chassis.

The history of the Beetle is an interesting one. And for those interested in owning a VW Beetle there is still a range of great quality second hand Beetles available. And there are countless restored Beetles and car clubs with many Beetle owners.

So if you’d love your own piece of automobile history grab a VW Beetle. The history of the VW Beetle has shown it to be one of the worlds great cars.

VIN Number Decoding For Classic Muscle Cars in this year

One of the best pieces of advice I was ever given in regards to buying a classic muscle car was to invest in high quality resource materials so I could crack the code on Vehicle Identification Numbers (VIN) to make sure that I was not getting scammed.

The best way to find a high quality book is to find what the experts are using. With the internet, you can type a subject like Camaro restoration book into the Amazon search box. You can also Google it and follow the links, which will take you to various forums and websites. Chevrolet by the Numbers, by Alvin Colvin, is the best book I have ever found for Chevrolet part numbers, Vehicle Identification Numbers (VIN), trim tags, and model ID. The book is an easy read, with chapters designated to the different components. Again, I used this process in my quest to purchase a rare Camaro. Just Google the car you are looking for and follow the links. The best resources will be obvious.

Here is a list of objects you will need when decoding your car.

Small flashlight, notebook, resource or reference book, mechanics mirror, pen or pencil, cordless or corded droplight, floor jack and jack-stands, coveralls, rags, brass wire brush, brake cleaner, yellow or white colored grease pencil, digital camera or camcorder.

If you are continuing to read this information, I can only surmise that buying a classic muscle car with the proper numbers and matching parts is important to you! Good! It should be! If this is true, I will walk you through an example of decoding a car. This will give you an idea of what it takes to properly decode a car.

Be prepared to take your time. I also discovered a sure fire way to determine who your true friends are. Ask them to go along to help you decode a car! Having an extra body can sometimes cut your time in half. I also recommend finding an expert or consultant on your car, and buying a couple of hours their time, especially if you are looking to purchase a special model classic car. It’s been my experience that an extra set of eyes can only help the cause. I found an expert through one of my reference books. Prior to me going to look at my current car, I spent about an hour talking with him, and making a list of things I should be looking for. (Of course, if you want someone to handle the process from A to Z, services are available. This is a great option if you are buying the car from remote.)

The Process

Before I arrived the owner told me the car was basically a roller project, meaning the engine and transmission were removed from the car. The engine, transmission and other components were placed in a pile where it would be easy to look at the numbers. The owner also claimed it was a limited edition Camaro, yet he didn’t have any paperwork like an original order invoice, or a protect o plate (a special metal plate shaped like a credit card that is used for warranty and repair services). This type of paperwork trail eliminates the need for further documentation. If you do not have this type of paperwork, then follow along. When I arrived at the location where the car was stored, the first thing I did was to check the VIN number. The VIN number is probably the most important number on a car. If you do not know how to decode a VIN on a particular Chevrolet, you will be unable to verify other components or numbers. What is nice about the book is it actually walks you through the whole decoding process, including providing the specific numbers location. As a sidebar, any good resource book on your particular make and model car will outline the way to decode your car, including number locations and decoding info. On 1968 and 1969 Camaros, the VIN number is located on the top of the dash board, on the drivers side. The number is visible through the windshield. I wiped the dirt and dust off of the VIN tag, and copied the numbers into my notebook.

VIN number

I was able to determine that my car was originally a V8, it was a 2 door sport coupe, made in 1969, assembled in Norwood Ohio, and it was the 662,8XXrd car built at that plant in that year.

Trim tag.

In 1969, all Camaro trim tags were located in the engine compartment, riveted on the upper left hand corner of the firewall. I took my rag and cleaned all of the dust and gunk off of the trim tag. Since the numbers were not that clear, I recleaned the trim tag, and removed the rest of the gunk. I used my flashlight to illuminate the numbers, and then copied the numbers into my notebook. Some of the trim tag numbers matched up with the VIN tag numbers, which was a good sign. The remaining numbers indicated that my car body was number 353,XXX to come down this plant’s assembly line. The interior was originally a standard black interior, and the car was built in the first week of June, 1969. The car was originally painted dusk blue and it was equipped with a spoiler package and a chrome trim package. So far everything was lining up. The reason for all of this detail is to illustrate how you can confirm that what you think you are buying is exactly what you are getting.

Before I move on, I want to share how this is relevant. A husband and wife from my car club went to look at a Chevelle. The car was advertised as a Super Sport. During the inspection process, and referencing the above book, they uncovered a number of inconsistencies. According to the numbers, the car had originally started out as a plain Jane 6 cylinder car. The car was now painted a different color, had a different color interior and a different engine. You get the picture. Over the years, one (or more) of the previous owners modified the car and tried to make it into a Super Sport. The point is it may have not been done maliciously, but the car still did not start out as a true Super Sport. And having the Super Sport option obviously raises the value of the car.

Engine code identification.

The engine is stamped in (2) places on a 69 Camaro. One is on the right front engine pad. The other location is on the rough casting portion on the rear of the engine, just above the oil filter. Again I wiped off the areas I just described with brake cleaner sprayed on a rag. You need to have a clean surface, and normally brake cleaner will do the trick. The front engine pad numbers appeared to have been restamped at one time, maybe after the engine block was decked (Decking in a machine process to check the flatness of the block deck for irregularities that cause compression and water leaks.) The tricky part is reading the numbers on the area above the oil filter. I recommend a really bright light and a magnifying glass. If that doesn’t do it, then I suggest taking a little muriatic acid an applying it to the numbers. This should make the numbers readable. The reason this number is sometimes hard to decipher is because these engines were hand stamped, and punched onto a rough surface. According to the numbers, I determined the engine was a 425 horsepower high performance engine, with a 4 speed manual transmission. The last numbers also corresponded with the last numbers in my VIN, which meant this was the original engine to this car. The numbers told me the engine was assembled June 14, which fell in line with the build date. The engine block part number that is cast into the rear of the block was cleaned with a rag and brake cleaner as well. The block part number indicated ahigh performance block used for Camaros. Another piece of the puzzle confirmed.

Rear axle identification.

The numbers on a Camaro rear axle are stamped on the top of the right axle tube. My experience has been that this area is normally pretty crusty and rusty. And this rear axle was no exception. After considerable wire brushing, I wiped the area clean with brake cleaner. Laying on my back, I shone the light on the area, while holding a mirror. It still wasn’t clear enough for me to read accurately. I then took my grease pencil, and ran it over the numbers. The purpose of the grease pencil is to provide contrast with the metal of the axle tube. When I put the mirror back over the area, I was rewarded with a very sharp image of the part numbers, which I copied into my notebook. According to the numbers, this rear axle assembly had a 4.10:1 gear ratio, limited slip. The axle was assembled June 16, 1969. Are you seeing a pattern starting to appear here? The axle numbers also indicated the axle to be original to the car based on the dates codes referencing June 1969 build date. I took the same approach with the other parts.

Here are my findings. The cylinder heads, intake manifold, carburetor, and transmission were the correct part numbers for the car. However none of these parts were date coded to the car. One of the heads was manufactured in April 1968, the other head was manufactured in February of 1969. The transmission was manufactured Jan 24th 1969. The reason I know all of these parts are not correctly date coded to the car is I decoded each one, by researching the part numbers, and date codes. All of this information is important, because not only did it verify what the owner had told me, and it also showed that the other parts were in line with the build date. Thereby providing further confirmation of what I was looking at. During my investigating, I took pictures with a digital camera of all of the parts and part numbers, as best as i could. I spent about 30 minutes walking around the car with a video camera and editorializing what I was taking footage of. I also took the list of things the Camaro expert had told me about and checked them off one by one. Later in the week I called the Camaro expert and shared my findings. I reviewed all of my research, including going over the individual part numbers, and the “things to look for” checklist. By the end of the phone call, I was 99 percent positive that this Camaro was what it was being advertised as.

The last thing I did was to have the car documented and certified by a Certified Camaro appraiser.

GM also stamped hidden VIN numbers in (2) different places on the car. The reason for the hidden VIN numbers was to add another step in preventing and identifying a stolen car. Because it is fairly easy to remove and swap out the VIN tag on the dash, the hidden VIN’s provided a back-up system of check and balances. For example, someone could possibly swap out a VIN tag, but if they didn’t know about the Hidden VIN numbers, a person in the know could easily identify the numbers not matching up. Because the car was bought a roller project, it was easy to check these hidden VIN’s, against the VIN tag on the dash. I wanted the appraiser to check them personally, and he confirmed the numbers as matching and authentic. In other words the certificate authenticates the car. Many appraisers will also supply you with a report on their findings. The nice thing about having a car certified is this type of paperwork is normally viewed as iron clad documentation. It normally raises the value of the car, because of the authenticity certificate. And if you ever go to sell the car, now you have documentation to provide the seller that the car is a real (Super Sport, Rally Sport, Z/28, etc. You fill in the blank)

Some people may wonder why would anyone go through all of this work.

However, keep in mind that many of these muscle cars are 20 plus years old and have gone through numerous owners and modifications. All of that history is prior to it being restored back to showroom original condition. In other words, many parts are bolt on and interchangeable from other models and different years. So just because the parts look ok, doesn’t mean that they even belong on the car. In the above example about the couple and the Chevelle, the car was priced as a Super Sport, yet the trim tag and other numbers reflected a totally different story. Even though the car was beautifully restored, it was really nothing more than a modified 6 cylinder, base model Chevelle that someone converted over to a V-8 at some time in it’s life. Don’t get me wrong, there is nothing wrong with modifying a car to an individual owners taste. The issue is when the car is sold and the seller forgets to mention (consciously or unconsciously) and inform the new owner of the modifications. Our Chevelle couple would have gladly paid the asking price if the car was a true Super Sport. But, because they knew how to decode the car, they were able to save themselves a lot of time, money and aggravation. At the time the difference between a plain Jane Chevelle and a real Super Sport was over $10,000. Just to throw some numbers out there, let’s be conservative and say it takes 6 hours of research to decode a car. Using our $10,000 figure, that equates to approximately $1,600 an hour. Not a bad return on your time investment. As muscle and classic cars have become more popular, I have seen many cases where just for the fun of it, an owner will start to do research on a car he or she owns.

Discovering your car isn’t really what you thought you purchased can really knock the wind out of you. By investing a small amount of money, and time, in researching and decoding your prospective muscle car purchase you can sleep at night knowing that you received the value you paid for. Anyone else interested in investing a couple of hours for peace of mind when purchasing a classic or muscle car???

Emissions Test – 10 Top Tips to Pass the Emissions Test in this year

Many states and counties require your vehicle to pass an emissions test every couple of years. Your car, truck or van cannot be driven or sold without a clean bill of health. Here are ten top tips to make sure your vehicle will pass the inspection.

1. If the “check engine” light is on, you will not pass the emissions test.

If it just recently came on, maybe the problem is something short-term and will go away after several driving trips. But if not, you will have to take care of whatever is causing the problem (see below).

2. Get an oil change if you haven’t got one in the past couple of months.

Sometimes gasoline can contaminate your oil in the crankcase which increases carbon monoxide emissions.

3. Change the air filter while you’re at it.

A dirty air filter can also increase carbon monoxide emissions and you can fail the emissions test.

4. Put in new spark plugs, properly gapped.

5. Check your gas cap to make sure it has no cracks, and that it fits and closes tight.

If there’s any problem with it, get a new one. Make sure the gas cap is tightly closed with three clicks before you go for the test.

6. Fill the tank with premium gasoline.

You don’t want unburned gas anywhere but in the gas tank. Higher octane gas will burn better. You can go back to the “cheap stuff” after the inspection.

7. Add some “dry gas” or other gas additive to your tank.

When you drive the car to warm it up for the test, the additive should help clean the catalytic converter and exhaust system.

Note: Be sure to read the labels for the right additive and follow the instructions.

8. Make sure your tires are at their full air pressure.

The emissions test may include putting your car on the dynamometer. The tester will check it for emissions while driving your car on a spinning cylinder at various speeds. Properly-filled tires will help maintain a more even performance and lower the risk of failure.

9. Arrive at the inspection site with half a tank or less of gasoline.

This can also help prevent any gas getting in places you don’t want it during the emissions inspection. You may want to keep this point in mind when you “gas up” according to tip number six.

10. Drive the car for about half an hour before the test and idle the engine while waiting in line.

The idea is to have the engine warm and operating at its peak fuel-burning efficiency. This will also help mix your additive and get it into the fuel system.

If the “check engine” light stays on, or if following these tips doesn’t get you through the emissions inspection, there are still a couple of things you can do.

A handheld diagnostic scanner can easily turn off the check engine light. Even if the light is off, your vehicle’s computer may still hold diagnostic trouble codes. A decent scanner will also be able to reset these codes.

However, your vehicle may trigger those same codes on the way to the inspection site. Even if it does not trigger the check engine light, you will fail the emissions test when they hook up their scanner to your car’s computer. Your scanner can detect and read trouble codes whether the check engine light is on or not.

The scanner tool can tell you where to look for emissions and engine-performance problems. With it you can check your car engine’s oxygen sensors and many other parameters to find the system and sub-system where the problem lies. Fix the problem and you will be sure to clear the emissions test.

"How To" Maintenance Tips for Your 3M Clear Bra Automobile Paint Protection Film in this year

1. 3M clear bras should not be waxed with a wax containing dyes or solvents. Some waxes and other substances may bond to the paint protection film. This can lead to yellowing and haziness. We suggest cleaning the film using Plexus or Original Bike Spirits, after washing the car, to lubricate and reduce friction. Abrasive polishes and/or rubbing compounds are not to be used.

2. If your 3M clear bra has minor scratches or scuffs pour rubbing alcohol on it and let stand for 1 minute. Some scratches will disappear. Is has been found that 3M brand paint protection film can be buffed for scratch removal. It is best to let a professional detailer do this kind of work because the process can be confusing or difficult, and cause more damage instead of repair.

3. When pressure washing your vehicle, make sure to keep the end of the pressure washer more than 3 ft away. Pressure washers and touch-less car washes can easily damage freshly applied paint protection films. Cleaning your car regularly is important to protect the paint and the clear bra.

4. If you see bubbles or edges peeling, DO NOT TOUCH THEM! Bring the vehicle back to the shop after curing. This is usually about 30 days. It is common for the edges to curl or peel or bubble about a 1/8″ away from the edge. If the clear bra was brought all the way to the edge of the hood or fenders, this is acceptable, because the peeling edges can be trimmed and still provide good coverage. Ask your installer if he can wrap the edges for the best coverage. Pre-cut kits and poor cut jobs that do not go to the edge will leave a lot of paint exposed. If you notice 1/8″ or less peeling bring the vehicle back to the shop and have the edges trimmed. If its more than that, the shop should replace the piece of clear bra.

5. Paint protection film is usually covered by insurance. If you are in an accident, make sure it is replaced as part of your insurance claim.

Headlights – Conventional Vs High Intensity Discharge (HID) Systems in this year

Nothing is worse than driving down the road and not being able to see where you are going. You always notice the difference when you have just changed the bulbs in your headlights. The question is what the difference is between conventional and High Intensity Discharge (HID) head lights. Some people want the brightness the HID lights offer, but are unsure if they are really worth the price. Others simply do not know how they will be able to install the new technology in their car. This is why you should get to know as much as possible about the two lights.

Conventional Head Lights

The lights which people have been driving with over the past few decades are considered by most to be the best lights for your car. The low price of the head lights is one of the biggest driving factors of what people like about the lights. You can get away with a light bulb change for less than $20 in most cases. It is also possible for you to be able to quickly and easily change out the bulbs yourself right in the parking lot of the auto parts store.

HID Head Lights

The HID lights first made their appearance with the luxury models and with the tuner crowd. The lights are easily identifiable by their blue hue. The head lights are much more expensive than the standard bulbs. It is also not recommended you change the bulbs for the lighting system on your own. Most people are cautioned that the power used by the bulbs can create a danger of you being electrocuted even with the power supply being disconnected from the bulb. The two main reasons why people like the bulbs is because of the intense light they offer and the long life they offer.

Comparison of the Two Head Lights

When asked if there is really a difference between the two kinds of bulbs, most people will tell you that to see the difference all you have to do is drive a car with HID bulbs in it. The clarity at which you can see everything which is coming at you is a night and day difference. Instead of being able to see a short arc of the road in front of you, you can see everything. This is because of the hue of the light as well as the intensity of the beam which is being broadcast by the bulb. It is also fair to point out that while the HID bulbs will cost more, they have the ability to last for five years without the intensity being decreased.

The kind of head lights you prefer will depend on your personal preferences. It is a good idea to check out the two in a driving comparison before you make a decision. People who are die-hard conventional light fans have been converted to using HID lights after driving one time with the brighter lights. You owe it to yourself to try the lights out in a real world test.