What’s the Best Way to Clean Heavy Equipment? in this year

If you have heavy equipment and either are washing it yourself, or are looking for a pressure washing contractor, you might be wondering what exactly is the best method to get it all clean.

Every machine owner or power wash tech probably has his own way of cleaning a piece of heavy equipment, but here’s some tips to make sure the job is done right and as quickly as possible.

Before I get into details, though, I have to address the variety of machine owner considerations, such as how often to clean and degrease an excavator or other piece of construction equipment.

Some owners and companies clean their equipment as rarely as a year or more and some monthly. As you can imagine, this can drastically change the amount of time and effort that goes into getting a machine clean. Pressure washing by itself will not clean and degrease an excavator, backhoe or any other piece of machinery. Power alone will not do it and too much power in the wrong places can push grease out of important wear areas.

Grease, over time will begin to harden, likely making it necessary to scrape it off areas around knuckles and on booms. The drier parts will not move with only high pressure, no matter how much you wash it.

These areas must be degreased using a suitable cleaner, and usually takes more time than the actual washing process. What that soap, or degreaser is, can have a lot to do with where you are washing the equipment and what the local and federal laws are.

Is it bio-degradeable? Is it acidic or alkaline? Where are the residues going? How are the hydrocarbons managed? For instance, lets say you have a wash bay with an oil/water separator. Do you know if the degreaser or soaps you are using are going to cause problems with the process of removing the oil from the water.

Hot water pressure washing has advantages over cold water cleaning. First, hot water is itself a kind of detergent, which means it can break down dirt, grease and oil by itself. Adding a good high pressure soap can then be more efficient, allowing you to use less, and reducing the amount of runoff, water used, and the soap on the ground, which is always better for the local environment.

Powering off dirt and grease with cold water takes much longer to achieve a satisfactory result and again, uses much more degreaser and soap.

IMPORTANT: Keep your tracks as clean as you can between equipment cleaning as heavily compacted mud and vegetation in and around the tracks of a machine like an excavator can take as long or longer than the entire rest of the machine.

This is even more important in the winter and the early spring. Wet mud, pieces of tree limbs, and branches and freezing can stop you dead in your tracks. And this will take even longer to get you free. So the operator should, at free times, make sure that the tracks are regularly attended to.

Lastly, is it cost effective to clean your equipment? If you are not particularly busy and you have a good hot water pressure washing machine, then yes, it is. But if you are busy and you’re paying wages to an operator who is better at land clearing than equipment washing, and thinks the job is beneath him, the answer is no.

A qualified professional tech, can degrease and pressure wash a machine faster and better, which can actually mean a cost savings, rather than an additional expense.

So the next time you want to get that excavator, backhoe, dump truck or what have you, all clean, you might just want to call a professional pressure washing service that uses hot water. If there’s no on site water, ask them if they are able to carry their own water, and how much experience they have cleaning heavy equipment.

And whether you’re located in Vancouver British Columbia, Dallas Texas, or Minot North Dakota, make sure you comply with your local and national eco standards.

Check here for more information on equipment washing, high and low pressure power for different cleaning jobs.

Squier Vintage Modified Tele SH and Strat HSS Review in this year

Many guitarists use budget Squier models as a base for their own custom instruments, swapping out the hardware, pickups and other parts. With Squier’s Vintage Modified Series guitars, the modifications have already been made, so you won’t need to shell out extra bucks after your initial purchase. Today we’re going to check out the Vintage Modified Tele SH and Strat HSS…

Squier Vintage Modified Tele SH

The Squier Tele SH has a variety of custom touches, like a Duncan Designed HB102 Alnico 5 neck humbucker, a Duncan Designed TE-103B Stack bridge pickup, a six-saddle bridge, black chrome knurled knobs and a reverse-configured control plate (the three-position pickup selector is located near the bottom of the lower bout instead of near the bridge pickup). However, the guitar also retains the classic features you’d want in a Tele, like the 21-fret neck with maple fingerboard, 25 ½-inch scale and 9 ½-inch radius.

Aside from some truly bizarre Givson-yes, Givson-models that Billy Gibbons showed me about 10 years ago, I’ve never seen a guitar made in India before. Another first: the body is made from Indian red cedar (apparently the wood doesn’t have to travel too far to the factory). This light-weight, resonant wood is also used to make dhol drums in India, so its transition to guitar material makes musical sense. The neck is carved from nice-looking maple that has tight grain, and all the wood parts are coated with a durable polyurethane finish.

Many of the Squier guitars I’ve auditioned over the years have playability comparable to Fender’s more expensive axes, and the Vintage Modified Tele SH is no exception. The neck offers a conservative C-shape profile, and the medium jumbo frets provide that”just right” balance of heft for bent notes and low resistance for shredding.

Performance

This model’s weakest link is its hardware. The tuners feel flimsy and fragile, and the bridge sucked away the notes’ sustain and body. As a result, the pickups never seemed to receive enough signal to reach their sweet spot, and the tone seemed somewhat thin. Add in a few extra bucks to upgrade the tuners and bridge, and you’ll have a killer ax that performs as well as many models costing twice the price.

Squier Vintage Modified Strat HSS

Like the Tele HS, the Squier Strat HSS is built on the foundation of a classic guitar body and neck, but it features a modified pickup configuration. Squier dropped a Duncan Designed HB-112 humbucker in the bridge position, while Duncan Designed SC-102 Stack pickups replace the standard neck and middle single-coils.

Beyond that, the Vintage Modified Strat HSS is a classic Strat to the core, with a vintage-style tremolo, five-position pickup selector, 21-frets with a rosewood fingerboard, and that timeless Strat look and feel. The controls remain the same as well: master volume, neck tone and middle tone. There’s no tone control for the bridge humbucker, which is mainlined to the master volume for maximum treble and gain. Like its Tele companion, the Strat has a body made from Indian red cedar, which provides a fast attack and resonant voice even when played unplugged. It felt a little heavier than the Tele, perhaps because of the tremolo bridge and the Strat’s slightly larger body size. As on the Vintage Modified Tele the neck has a 9.5-inch radius, C-shaped profile and medium jumbo frets. The neck plays almost identical to the Tele that I evaluated, although the rosewood fingerboard gave the neck a slightly slinkier, sexier feel.

Performance

Plugged in, the Strat HSS delivered great classic rock tone from the Duncan bridge humbucker. It maintained clarity even through high-gain amos, with emphasis on the bass and treble. I had to boost the midrange slightly more than we did with other humbucker-equipped Strats, but this is probably because Indian red cedar produces a brighter sound than ash and alder woods. The single-coils produced bit and bark that will please most blues and Hendrix fans.

Unfortunately, as on the Vintage Modified Telecaster, the tuners were a letdown. I recommend upgrading them with a good set of locking tuners, which will improve the guitar’s tone and also let you abuse the tremolo as much as you want, without going out of tune.

Squier Vintage Modified Tele SH and Strat HSS Verdict

With its mix of classic features and customs updates, the Squier Vintage Modified Tele SH has what modern players want. Best of all, it plays like a good Tele should, and purists will certainly approve. And should you love the tone and vibe of a classic Strat but need a high-octane bridge pickup, the Vintage Modified Strat HSS gives you hot-rod performance at an economy car price.

Travel Nursing Series: Travel Nursing in Greece in this year

Why do people travel? Perhaps plain wanderlust urges people see new places and have new experiences or the need to get away from everyday stress or pressures at home or work. Some may want to make a religious pilgrimage to a sacred site or a new career may beckon. Whatever the reason, travel allows you to make a connection in another country, meet different people and experience different cultures.

One of the easiest careers to “take on the road” is that of the health care professional. Physicians and nurses are in demand in every country in the world and it is easy to find work overseas. Nursing skills are universal and those of nurses in the United States are among the most advanced. Getting certified to work overseas in a foreign country, although a bit tedious, is relatively easy. Usually a placement agency can help guide the US nurse through the process. Salary and benefits are in line with standard travel nursing guidelines. Subsidized housing, signing bonuses, paid vacations and health insurance are offered, depending on the particular job. You will need to pack your own nursing uniforms and nursing shoes as these items are not provided by the employer.

Nurses in Greece are in significant demand. To find and apply for a position as a nurse in Greece it is best to use a professional agency to help with the procedure. Travel nurse agencies help guide nurses to find the ideal job in Greece. International employment applications can be overwhelming with the amount of paperwork required but a good agency will help with the necessary visas and certifications. The agencies are the intermediary between employer and nurse, negotiating a contract that is beneficial to both parties. They will provide job particulars such as work hours, overtime regulations and nursing uniform requirements. Many international hospitals have adopted the US trend of wearing uniform scrubs instead of traditional nursing uniforms. Shopping for medical uniforms in Greece may be difficult, but online websites offering large selections of uniforms scrubs at discount prices are available for your uniform needs.

The Greek National Health system provides a basic medical service to Greek nationals and it has a reciprocal agreement with the British National Health Service. There are many public and private hospitals in Greece, all with varying standards. Some private hospitals have affiliations with U.S. facilities. These hospitals are an excellent resource for American nurses looking for positions abroad in Greece. The staff doctors at these private hospitals have been trained in U.S. or another international teaching institution. In public medical clinics, especially on Greek islands, often very little English is spoken. Many visitors to Greece, and Greek citizens, transfer from island care units to hospitals in Athens hospitals for more modern and professional care.

Medical facilities in Greece range from barely adequate to very good. Public hospitals are severely understaffed, especially during the night shift on non-emergency wards. Nursing jobs in these facilities is very demanding work. The standards of nursing and after care, particularly in the public health sector lag behind what is normally acceptable in the US. In order to insure adequate care, those patients who can afford it hire private nurses to tend to them during their hospital stay. For those with good insurance coverage, private hospitals are available with modern facilities and excellent care. Travel nurses generally procure jobs either in a private hospital or as a private nurse in the public hospital. Knowledge of Greek is, of course, helpful. Doctors and facilities are generally good on the mainland, but may be limited on the islands. It is possible to get by with English, but it will take time to translate patients. In public medical clinics, especially on Greek islands, often very little English is spoken.

Life in the Greek Islands is quite different from that in the United States. Greeks enjoy life today on entirely flexible schedules. The relaxed attitude of the Greeks to time is similar to that of Brazilians, rarely doing today what can be put off until tomorrow. It takes a little effort on the part of the travel nurse to reduce expectations based on time. The Greek word “filoxenia” means “love of strangers”, thus the travel nurse will find themselves welcomed into Greek life with great exuberance. There are many religious festivals and family celebrations.

The day starts early in Greece, before the heat of the day sets in. Afternoon siestas last from 2pm to 5 pm. Many workers return to their jobs after the siesta to work until 8 pm. The dinner hour rarely starts before 10:00 pm and often lasts well beyond midnight. Travel nurses will need to adjust their internal meal clock in order to join the social scene in Greece.

Strikes and demonstrations occur regularly in Greece and be disruptive, especially if you are on your way to work. These occurrences are normally orderly, but if necessary tear gas will be used for riot control. Local news sources keep locals abreast of news of demonstrations. Purse snatchers and pick pockets operate at tourist locations and on crowded public transportation, as in any public area.

Time off from work should be spent visiting the many wonders of Greek civilization. Public ferries run between islands, making access to antiquity sites easy and affordable. There are numerous good Greek travel guides available to detail the numerous sites to visit.

Travel by car in Greece can be an adventure in itself. Temporary Greek residents must carry their valid driver’s license from their country of origin as well as an international driver’s permit (IDP). Drivers not carrying an IDP can be penalized for failure to have one in the event of an accident, and may further be open to a civil suit as well. Heavy traffic and poor highways pose hazards, especially at night or in inclement weather. Many roads are typically poorly maintained and frequently pothole-ridden.

Greece has a list of “must see” sites that is unparalleled. First and foremost is the Acropolis in Athens. Situated on rocky ground high above the city streets, the Acropolis represents classic Greek culture at its zenith. A visit to Olympia, the site of the original Olympic Games and the ruins at Epidaurus, where the ancient theater is still in use for festivals, are must see sites for tourists. A popular destination in Crete for tourists is the Minoan palace at Knossos and the opportunity to experience Macedonian culture and view the tomb of Phillip II of Macedon draws people to explore Vergina. The opportunities to explore ancient Greek culture are limitless and a stay in Greece as a travel nurse will yield ample time to get to know this wonderful country and its friendly people.

One of the first things you will notice as you take out on your travels of Greece is the wide array of litter strewn virtually everywhere. Hillsides are awash with discarded appliances, cans. bottles, boxes, rope and other litter, leaving the traveler to wonder why the breathtaking scenery is not more appreciated by the locals. Beaches and the sea are not exempt. Plastic bags, bottles and cans float by on a regular basis.

Half-finished buildings join Greek ruins, dotting the landscapes and streets. Concrete is the building material of choice and it is everywhere. Unfortunately, Greek concrete workmanship is not of good quality and often results in unsightly messes. Greek construction is often done on an intermittent schedule, dragging out for several years. Houses are often left half-finished for months, or even years at a time. Another familiar site in Greece is the chain link fence. It is thrown up around anything and everything. Much fencing falls into the broken, bent or rusted category making one wonder if the fences serve any purpose.

Despite the unsightly aspects of Greek litter and construction, most people will agree that Greece has more wonders than warts, and travel among the islands is the adventure of a lifetime. So grab your uniform scrubs, nursing shoes, stethoscope and travel gear and head off to the beauty of the Greek islands.

Some Interesting Facts About Lamborghini in this year

The technology behind each Lamborghini masterpiece is said to be a beast. From its unique aerodynamic features and looks, it comes to no surprise that most sports car enthusiasts prefer the exotic car brand. Almost everybody dreams of owning one.

If you’ve ever been to any place in the UAE, you’ll immediately notice their culture for luxury cars, including Lamborghinis. But there are many features to consider, like the most advanced safety options, entertainment technology, and customization.

Interesting Lamborghini Facts

Known for their exotic cars, Lamborghinis have been praised from the engine, to the body. It was first started to build better cars than Ferrari’s infamous vehicles. If you’re planning to buy your own Lambo, here are some interesting facts you should know.

1. Lamborghini was a master mechanic.

Most people consider Ferruccio Lamborghini as the original Tony Stark. He was stationed on an isolated island during WWII for the Italian Royal Air Force as a vehicle maintenance supervisor. Because it was difficult to secure parts, Lamborghini cobbled together scraps to keep his machines running.

2. The first Lamborghinis were tractors.

He used his WWII experience to put together tractors out of spare parts. From there, Lamborghini officially started his business, and people loved his products. Today, Lamborghini Trattori operates under a different company, but are still designed by the same firm that created the Gallardo and the Maserati MC12.

3. Ferrari’s mean customer service.

Ferruccio actually owned a Ferrari 250GT back in the days. He wanted a replacement for his clutch, so he went to the Maranello headquarters. After asking Enzo Ferrari, the reply he got was, “You’re just a silly tractor manufacturer, how could you possibly know anything about sports cars?” Four months later, he released Lamborghini 350GTV.

4. Current model with scissor doors.

Murcielago is the only current model with scissor doors. These rotate up and forward on a hinge, near the front of the door. The Countach, the Diablo and the Murcielago all have scissor doors, but the Gallardo does not. Both the Countach and the Diablo are no longer being produced.

5. No less than a V8 engine.

Most of the Lamborghini models throughout the history of the company have come with the legendary Lamborghini V12 engine. The newest model, Gallardo, only has V10. No Lamborghini have ever been produced with less than a V8 since production of the Silhouette stopped in 1989.

6. The fastest Lamborghini

The fastest Lamborghini is the Le Mans version of the Murcielago R-GT model. It has a top speed of 370 km/h. Meanwhile, the fastest street model from Lamborghini is the Murcielago LP640, which has an estimated top speed of 340 km/h. Both of the models have a V12 engine with more than 6000 cc.

Lamborghini Dubai Service Center

The Lamborghini line is divided into two segments, Gallardo and Murcielago. Maintenance ranges heavily based on what you select. Specialists recommend that you change the oil and oil filter every 7500 miles. The cost of new transmission could cost you 180-200K Dirhams.

Little Known C3 Corvette Stingray Facts in this year

The Corvette Stingray has long been a popular car with people from all walks of life. The iconic shape of a Corvette Stingray can turn heads even today, 30 years after the last Stingray was produced. This article is intended to provide information regarding the Corvette Stingray to all Corvette fans, whether you already own a Corvette, are considering buying a Corvette, or just like interesting facts and figures regarding classic Corvettes.

The C3 Corvette Stingrays are the generation of Corvettes produced between 1968 and 1982. The general design idea for the Corvette Stingray was modeled after the Mako Shark II concept car. When the term “C3” is used, it refers to the fact that they are the 3rd generation of Corvettes. Each generation of Corvette was given a designation as such. The current Corvettes (as of 2011) are referred to as C6, or 6th generation Corvette. Each generation refers to any major changes that are made, such as body design, drivetrain, etc. Of course, each year model within a single generation varies slightly from one year to the next, yet they still retain the same general look and feel as the rest of their generation. In the case of C3 Corvettes, the engine and chassis components were mostly carried over from the previous generation, however the body and interior were new, thus the new generation designation. This can be very useful when looking for information regarding a specific year Corvette, as most Corvette enthusiasts refer to the generation more frequently than a specific year or range of years.

One of the most obvious facts that stands out about the C3 Corvette is that it was the first use of T-top removable roof panels in a Corvette. Many of the 3rd generation Corvettes had removable glass or fiberglass tops that allow the driver or passengers to remove the roof panels, therefore allowing a more open top.This was a rather novel concept at the time, and it was not the originally intended design. The designers initially wanted to make the car a Targa Top, which means the entire roof panel is removable, hence the shortened name T-Top. After testing, the engineers determined that the lack of a support brace in the middle proved structurally insufficient for the powerful V-8 engines. This combined with the fact that the body was made of fiberglass made for a potential design flaw that could cause the body to flex under acceleration, resulting in cracked windshields, chipped paint, and other complications. As such, the designers added the brace in the middle, which seemed to resemble the letter T. The name remained “T-Top” even though the design was changed substantially from the original and the name was meant to reflect the previous design.

During the C3 years, GM made many attempts to further the development of the Corvette, which ultimately has led to the current design. One such attempt, which is also a relatively little known fact, is that there was once a Rotary Engine Corvette. In 1970, Chevrolet licensed the Wankel rotary engine (similar to the type used in the famed Mazda RX7 and RX8) and began building a two-rotor and a four-rotor Corvette in its testing and experimental department. A fiberglass mockup was approved in June 1971 by then GM President Ed Cole. On September 13, 1973 a 266 cubic inch two-rotor Corvette was displayed in Frankfurt, Germany. The four-rotor 390 cubic inch Corvette was put on display in Paris, France on Oct. 4, 1973, as well as the two-rotor. The 2-rotor engine GM developed was a fuel and oil hungry engine, and wasn’t practical for production. On September 24, 1974, GM President Ed Cole postponed the introduction of the Wankel engine, most likely due to emissions difficulties combined with fuel and oil concerns. The rotary engine Corvette never made it to production. This venture did prove useful, however. It helped GM understand the limitations of the car, and venture forward into other areas of exploration.

Another of these innovative ideas was also taking shape around the same time. GM attempted to produce a mid-engine Corvette, to rival the mid-engine sports cars of Italy. It was called the XP-882, and it was first shown at New York Auto Show in 1970. The engine was a 400 cubic inch small block V-8 mounted behind the seats, transversely (like most of today’s front wheel drive cars, with the engine sitting sideways). The engineers built two XP-882’s. Shortly after the 2 were built, John DeLorean, the man who later started the company bearing his name behind the famous DeLorean cars of Back To The Future fame, became Chevrolet general manager. John cancelled the program, as it was expensive and impractical to build. It was the hit of the auto show, but GM never produced or sold the XP-882 Corvette. At least one, if not both, of these extremely rare Corvettes is still known to exist.

If you are a collector, or want to find a rare and valuable piece of history, look for a 1970 Corvette. 1970 Corvettes are considered by many among the most desirable of the C3 generation, as only 17,316 were produced that year due to production issues stemming from labor strikes. To give you an idea why that number is relevant, the Ford Mustang production for the same year was 190,727, more than 10 times the volume! This was the lowest production number since 1962, and quality examples in good shape are getting harder and harder to find.

If you are looking for rarity, one of the rarest and most desirable of all production C3 Corvette Stingrays is the 1969 ZL1 Corvette. The $4,718 ZL1 package required many other options, including $1,032 L88 Special L88 (all aluminum block) 427 cu. in. 430hp Engine, $81 K66 Transistor Ignition System, $37 F41 Special Front and Rear Suspension, $384 J56 Special Heavy Duty Brakes, and $46 G81 Posi-Trac Rear Axle. Radio and air conditioning were not available with the ZL1 package, and only 2 out of the 38,762 Corvettes made that year had the ZL1 package. The total package price of this car new was approximately $11,000, including the base price of $4781. To put that number in perspective, $11,000 was the price of some small 3 bedroom houses, or a new Ferrari at that time! The same year, a buyer could get a well equipped Pontiac Firebird Trans Am for around $4,300, making this a truly rare and exceptional car.

The C3 Stingray generation are to date the largest generation of Corvettes ever produced, and are the most popular today with collectors. Of the over 1.5 million Corvettes built between 1953 and 2010, over 540,000 were made during the C3 generation, between 1968 and 1982. These are the well-known “Stingray” design, although the slightly different name “Sting Ray” had been used as far back as 1963. Corvette # 500,000 was a white 1977 Stingray. It rolled off the assembly line to major fanfare on March 15, 1977. This is an exceptional collector’s car, as it celebrated half a million Corvettes ever made.

It is a well-known fact that all Corvettes today are produced in only one place, which is the Corvette factory in Bowling Green, Kentucky. However, this wasn’t always the case. Up until 1981, Corvettes were made in St. Louis, Missouri. The last St. Louis Corvettes ever built left the factory on June 1981 and July 1981. Are you curious as to why they only produced one each month? Bowling Green production was already in effect, and for several months both factories worked in tandem, allowing the St. Louis factory to assemble as many cars as they could with the parts still left in their inventory. This allowed them to save on shipping and labor costs, as moving large parts for automobiles is a rather expensive and labor-intensive undertaking. After these two cars left the factory, Bowling Green, Kentucky, became the only factory to produce Corvettes. This is the only time when Corvettes were produced simultaneously in two factories. Producing the cars in only one factory allows much tighter quality controls, providing quality over quantity, so that has remained the standard for Corvettes. The very last one built in St. Louis was white and has a build date of July 31, 1981. Somehow, the car managed to survive for 30 years, and is now restored exactly as it was originally built, with all the frame and chassis markings, and every detail exactly as it was when it left the factory. A hidden plaque was originally installed by the plant workers in the cars right front fenderwell to designate the last car down the production line, which helped authenticate the car. The car sported a 350 Cubic inch engine at 190 horsepower and a 3-speed Turbo-Hydramatic 350 automatic transmission.The car was sold at the Barrett-Jackson’s Las Vegas auction in September, 2010 for $150,000.

I hope these facts about Corvette Stingrays has proven both useful and interesting. The Corvette has truly been an iconic car, capturing the hearts of generations, both young and old.

Chevrolet Corvette Named After a War Ship in this year

Chevrolet Corvette named after a War Ship you say? Corvette is a French word given to (nautical, historical) a flush-decked warship of the 17th-18th centuries having a single tier of guns; it ranked next below a frigate; In the modern navy, a lightly armed and armored blue water warship, smaller than a frigate, capable of trans-oceanic duty.

Most modern Navies of the world include War Ships in the Corvette class in their fleets. You may remember seeing in the news ROKS Cheonan (PCC-772) was a South Korean Pohang-class Corvette of the Republic of Korea Navy (ROKN), commissioned in 1989. On 26 March 2010, it broke in two and sank near the sea border with North Korea. North Korean torpedo from an attack submarine was believed to be the cause of its sinking.

In 1953 the first of the classic Corvettes hand built in Flint, Michigan named after a famous class War Ship the two door sports car was meant to be a gentlemen’s sports car. Although a Classic beauty it was under powered with its 6 cylinder engine it almost fell by the wayside.

The birth of the Chevrolet Corvette may not have happened had it not been for the War. You see steel was still in short supply back in 1953 which sent the car designer looking for a new idea. A promising new product hit the market that was durable and could be shaped into ca car body without much trouble. And a revolution started with the invention of fiberglass. The first of the Corvettes were hand built with fiberglass bodies and standard Chevrolet parts.

The 53 was powered with Blue Flame 6 cylinder truck motor that proved to be underpowered for the Corvette. It did get some upgrades to spice it up a little a three duce intake set up and by 54 some of the dealers were installing Paxton supercharges.

Many say had it not been for the development and release of the small block V8 a 265 cubic inch engine of 1955 the Corvette would not be with us today. From 1955 on the new V8 put the Chevrolet Corvette on the map being a true performer.

Owning one of these classics today has become a matter of immense pride. From the first to the models be built today they are stylish and classic and many appreciate the beauty of a high powered Chevy Corvette. Although very costly there is the attraction of their fuel economy. For the adventurous true connoisseur they are especially popular.

The market for restored Chevrolet Corvettes is powerful with the invention of internet auction sites, buying and selling these classic beauty’s has become safe, easy and convenient. You can find restored original condition better than when they were new. Another class out there is restored using the latest technologies like disk brakes and modern power options and air conditioning. Many get attached and will not ever let them go.

How To Build A Rat Rod – From Beginner To Expert in this year

So you have finally decided to build your Rat Rod car and you feel that you know what to do, but if you are smart, you will always be open to suggestions. Knowing the basics will help you get a good start.

For those of you who are new at this, keep it simple. No one wants their project to remain a project, and not a driver. Beginners should save up a bit more money and try to get something that runs and drives. Bodywork and modifications can be done at your leisure, as long as your Rat Rod doesn’t have huge holes in it. Spend more time customizing your Rat Rod than fixing it. Messing with a car when you don’t have the experience is very tough, and although you might have some friends to help, chance are they will not always be there to help you. Don’t get a Rat Rod that has electrical issues or motor problems. It’s most likely that someone has “patched” it up to get it sale-able and now you are stuck with someone else’s headache. Don’t fall in love with a piece of junk. Let your brain choose your new Rat Rod, not your emotions.

For those of you that have been doing this for a while, here are a few tips for you. Keeping the cool factor with Flathead Fords and 392 Chrysler Hemi’s are great. Nothing show a better Rat Rod then with period correct parts arranged and selected in a tasteful manner. Try not to find anything old and rusty and just weld it to the car or bolt it to the motor. Having a unique powered car is cool though. There is nothing wrong with the old reliable Chevy small block, and with all the aftermarket parts out there, you can make it look correct for that era. Big blown motors are not necessary as Rat Rods are not made to be driven at the strip, but if you have the means, you can do it, but like we always say, keep it period correct. Find a blower from the early 40’s or 50’s. Big fancy drum brakes from old Buick’s are popular. Use your imagination and keep it cool.

Whether you are new at this, or are just looking for other ideas for a new build, make a plan, and follow through with it and build the Rat Rod of your dreams.

Vintage Volkswagen Racing: The Beginning of Deano Dyno-Soar in this year

Dean Lowry joined Joe Vittone and his VW dealership Economotors in Riverside, California in 1955. After realizing how easy it was to repair and service Volkswagen Dean learned all he could and increased his skill level. He decided to make a career of Volkswagens and increasing their performance on the drag strip.

While working for Century Motors in Alhambra, California, Dean helped to build a racing VW beetle that he raced regularly for five months. He then built a dragster with a Porsche engine and began campaigning it in several local drag racing events.

Joe asked Dean to return to Economotors in 1963 and began once again to work with EMPI performance parts. He developed exhaust systems, carburetor kits and valve kits. At this time, Dean built the famous Inch Pincher race VW, one of the most famous race cars.

In 1968 Dean left Economotors again and partnered up with his brother Ken to start their own VW repair and service shop in Santa Ana, California. The brothers wanted to focus solely on building and repairing VW engines full time. This new business was called Deano Dyno-Soars, after Dean’s nickname of Deano or Dino.

The Lowry brothers stuck with the dinosaur theme throughout their business, and took up the color purple. They created the Purple Dyno-Soar engine, which was painted purple. The racecars and even their service shop was also colored purple. It became their trademark color.

The Lowrys often went drag racing with Dean’s daily driver, a 1954 VW sedan with a 2180cc engine. The car had been lightened to reduce the weight. Custom lightweight spun-aluminum wheels were designed specifically for drag racing VWs and made their debut on the Dyno-Soar racing vehicle. It’s best time was 11.62 sec and was the car to beat in the NHRA H/Gas class.

One major advancement Deano Dyno-Soar made in the VW racing world was developing an aftermarket crankcase that allowed VW engines up to the size of 3 liters to be built and housed in the rear engine compartment. It was known as the Ultra Case. Deano Dyno-Soar also designed and developed the first set of aftermarket cylinder heads for VW drag racing. They allowed larger valves to be used than a regular VW head.

After winning numerous races and trophies, they decided to retire the drag racing VW in 1972. The business also called its doors in 1972 and the brothers went their separate ways.

Why Rust is Like Cancer to Your Car in this year

Rust can absolutely ruin the metal on a car. It is best to prevent the rust from ever taking hold on your car by washing it frequently. I recommend washing at least once a week, especially in areas that use salt on the road during the cold months. All that salt and dirt and grime that builds up tends to hold the moisture in and that leaves a perfect environment for rust to begin. It often will set up in a place that has been dented or the paint has chipped. Exam your car often for small spots of rust. It is much easier to repair the rusted area when it is just a small spot.

That’s really the key. You want to repair the area while it is only on the surface. Once the rust travels deeper into the metal it becomes a much bigger and more expensive repair job. My work restoring vintage muscle cars taught me early on that rust can be lurking underneath a shoddy patch job that has been painted over. You can do a check for this by simply going around the car and knocking on the metal.

That can tell you, based on the clear metal sound or the thud of putty work used to hide rust, if the car is solid or not. It is a test I do before purchasing any car, whether it is only a year old or is one of the vintage muscle cars that I will be restoring. You should also inspect underneath the car and check the wheel wells as well. Both are prime locations for rust to begin. Never buy a car that has been in an accident, even if it was just a small accident. They car likely received some sort of damage to the paint that will be a prime target for rust. Even if the person selling the car claims to have had the car repaired by an expert. Don’t purchase it. Even with an expert doing the repair, it is very likely that rust will take hold. Take the time to check out any car before you purchase. It could save you thousands of dollars in costly rust repairs, in the long run.

Protecting The Car With A Garage Or A Car Cover? in this year

When winter comes along, many people think that cars now belong indoors. They know that leaving a car outdoors unprotected is not an option. It is a recipe for disaster. Any car that is left parked outside, without any form of protection, is guaranteed to get wrecked in some way or another. The fact remains; a car that is uncovered has a shorter life expectancy.

So the question remain, what form of protection to provide? There is a choice of two forms of protection; a garage, or a car cover. Both have their own advantages and disadvantages. They must be weighed up by the individual, to see which is the better of the two for him.

Garages:

The advantage of garages is that when parked in a garage, the car is completely closed off from any form of weather condition, and therefore cannot, in any way, be harmed by them. Garages are also very convenient for the car owner, as he always know where his car is parked, and never has to search for a space. Another advantage of garages is that they can be used by anyone. More or less any car can drive into the garage and be protected.

However, the disadvantages of having a garage largely lie in the money and space involved. Garages are expensive to build as they are not merely three wall and a door. There is more to a garage, and the money mounts up. Aside from this, a lot of people simply do not have the space to build a garage. Even if they did, they would much prefer to use that space for extending the house, rather than building a room to keep a car over night.

In addition, when a car is stored in a garage it is not dust and dirt free. Whilst the garage may be able to protect it from the detriments of nature, and car thieves, the car is still exposed to dust and dirt, and hence will still need constant cleaning.

Car covers:

The main advantage of car covers is the how compact they are. Car covers, when not in use, can be folded up and tucked away,out of sight. They can even be stored in the trunk of the car. This enables the car owner to take it along with him wherever he goes, so that he and his car are always covered. This is something that garages can never have – portability.

Car cover are also inexpensive, and cost effective. Cover covers are a drop in the bucket compared to the expense of a garage, and they also provide excellent coverage and protection. In fact they will even protect the car from dust and dirt, unlike garages. They will be able to save the car owner hundreds of dollars over the years that would have otherwise been used for cleaning, polishing and repairs.

On the other hand, the good car covers only come custom-made. This means that they are designed to fit the one car, perfectly. The cover will fit the car like a glove, maximising the protection, but it means that no other car can use it. Thus, it cannot be shared amongst family and friends, and when a new car is bought, the cover needs to be changed too.

In addition, car covers are not as sturdy as garages. Yes they will be able to protect the car from just about everything, including knocks and scrapes. Covers absorb the impact without leaving a mark on the car itself. However this is on a small scale, and should there be a more fierce collision, the cover will be inept at shielding the car.